©

une-allegresse:

Body comparative

(via bodypartss)

Dark thing,
make a myth of yourself:

all women turn into lilacs,

all men grow sick of their errant scent.
You could learn

to build a window, to change flesh
into isinglass, nothing

but a brittle river, a love of bone.
by Jennifer Chang, from “This Corner of the Western World,” The History of Anonymity (University of Georgia Press, 2008)

(Source: a-pair-of-ragged-claws, via alonesomes)

we have now been accounted for
and it is written on our empty graves
that After everything still I stayed.
And I mean it.
I stayed. I stayed. I stayed.
by Buddy Wakefield, “Self-Portrait”   (via malglories)

(Source: howtoleavetheozarks, via alonesomes)

wearyourlabel:

Margaret Cho for Miss Representation (x)

THIS is so important to share. 

(Source: maddseline, via thatu)

These girls aren’t wounded so much as post-​wounded, and I see their sisters everywhere. They’re over it. I am not a melodramatic person. God help the woman who is. What I’ll call “post-​wounded” isn’t a shift in deep feeling (we understand these women still hurt) but a shift away from wounded affect: These women are aware that “woundedness” is overdone and overrated. They are wary of melodrama, so they stay numb or clever instead. Post-​wounded women make jokes about being wounded or get impatient with women who hurt too much. The post-​wounded woman conducts herself as if preempting certain accusations: Don’t cry too loud; don’t play victim. Don’t ask for pain meds you don’t need; don’t give those doctors another reason to doubt. Post-​wounded women fuck men who don’t love them and then they feel mildly sad about it, or just blasé about it; they refuse to hurt about it or to admit they hurt about it—​or else they are endlessly self-​aware about it, if they do allow themselves this hurting.

The post-​wounded posture is claustrophobic: jadedness, aching gone implicit, sarcasm quick on the heels of anything that might look like self-​pity. I see it in female writers and their female narrators, troves of stories about vaguely dissatisfied women who no longer fully own their feelings. Pain is everywhere and nowhere. Post-​wounded women know that postures of pain play into limited and outmoded conceptions of womanhood. Their hurt has a new native language spoken in several dialects: sarcastic, jaded, opaque; cool and clever. They guard against those moments when melodrama or self-​pity might split their careful seams of intellect, expose the shame of self-​absorption without self-​awareness.


by Leslie Jamison, “Grand Unified Theory of Female Pain” (via not-nai)

(Source: et--cetera, via bizcasualrage)

kaimankazazian:

Favored Grace by Jackie Young
for Trough The Looking Glass SS’14
euo:

Stanley Kubrick on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

euo:

Stanley Kubrick on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

(via ennui-or-something)

(Source: stonerboner)

dinolands:

when i trust you we can do it with the lights on

slayer

(Source: apotropaicz, via corrivate)

I love my skin!

(Source: arthaemisia, via thatu)

geminiio:

i need ferguson to go down in history books. i need school children in the year 2074 to learn about michael brown being shot on august 9th, 2014 by officer darren wilson. i need this to spark a movement. this can not lose the focus of society a mere month after it happened. 

(via fuckyeahhardfemme)

slambien:

fishingboatproceeds:

Cara Delevingne will play Margo Roth Spiegelman in the Paper Towns movie. 
Like everyone involved in the film, I was blown away by her audition. She really, really, really gets Margo.

I get that appearance is not the most important thing when casting actors to play book characters in movies, but I have to admit I’m a little thrown by this casting, just because Margo’s weight/body shape is pointed out both in the book and in interviews by John himself.
From the book:

"I mean, for instance, do you think I’m fat?”
“Jesus, no,” I said. “You’re—” And I stopped myself from saying not skinny, but that’s the whole point of you; the point of you is that you don’t look like a boy. “You should not lose any weight.”
She laughed, waved her hand at me, and said, “You just love my big ass.”

I’m not going to say whether or not Ms. Delevingne “looks like a boy,” as boys and girls and non-binary people come in all shapes and sizes, etc., but it is clear in the book that Margo would probably not have, say, the thin sort of body shape of a model who has been on the catwalk of Victoria’s Secret fashion shows, as Cara Delevingne has.
Again, I get that details of appearance are less important than an actor’s ability. I doubt anyone would have liked Daniel Radcliffe to have been rejected for the role of Harry Potter because he had blue eyes instead of green.
But what’s bothering me is that John himself, when looking at models for the book cover of Paper Towns when it was first published in 2008, specifically avoided choosing models that were particularly thin to represent Margo.
From a 2008 interview:

A lot of the models that were sent to me looked kind of like clothes hangers, or very thin, sort of disturbingly thin women […] and I was looking for, like, a sixteen year old girl who looked like a sixteen year old girl.

Again, sixteen year old girls also come in all shapes and sizes, and I’m sure there are sixteen year old girls out there who, as John puts it, “look kind of like coat hangers.” There are very thin girls out there. Margo as a character just isn’t one of them.
And my problem here is that after the success of The Fault In Our Stars, John Green likely has a little more influence when it comes to the making of this movie than other authors would for their adaptations. I don’t know this for sure, but considering how involved he was in the making of TFiOS, and the fact that he says in this post that he was there to watch auditions, I have to suspect that there is a chance he could have said, “I wrote this character as a curvy/fat/not thin young woman, and I would prefer to stay true to that.” Of course, he could have said that and was overruled, but what I’m getting at here is that this could have been a phenomenal chance to see some real representation of a non-stereotypically Hollywood skinny heroine. Paper Towns is likely to be a successful movie after the amazing success of TFiOS, and countless sixteen year old girls who do look like Margo, who have a “big ass,” who don’t see girls who look like them on the big screen, they could have been able to go see a Fox 2000 film in theaters starring a girl who looks like them.
Instead, they’ve cast an actress who, as far as I can ascertain from information online, is 5’10” and about 112 lbs, with a BMI of about 16. (BMI is flawed in many ways, but I’m using it to illustrate my point: Cara Delevingne is solidly in the “underweight” category, a far cry from the character who John Green himself did not want to be represented by an underweight fashion model.)
Of course, I was not in the room for her audition. I’m sure she’s a wonderful actress, and if John says she understands Margo, I believe him. I’m just disappointed that this gleaming golden opportunity to have a fat leading actress wasn’t taken advantage of.

slambien:

fishingboatproceeds:

Cara Delevingne will play Margo Roth Spiegelman in the Paper Towns movie

Like everyone involved in the film, I was blown away by her audition. She really, really, really gets Margo.

I get that appearance is not the most important thing when casting actors to play book characters in movies, but I have to admit I’m a little thrown by this casting, just because Margo’s weight/body shape is pointed out both in the book and in interviews by John himself.

From the book:

"I mean, for instance, do you think I’m fat?”

“Jesus, no,” I said. “You’re—” And I stopped myself from saying not skinny, but that’s the whole point of you; the point of you is that you don’t look like a boy. “You should not lose any weight.”

She laughed, waved her hand at me, and said, “You just love my big ass.”

I’m not going to say whether or not Ms. Delevingne “looks like a boy,” as boys and girls and non-binary people come in all shapes and sizes, etc., but it is clear in the book that Margo would probably not have, say, the thin sort of body shape of a model who has been on the catwalk of Victoria’s Secret fashion shows, as Cara Delevingne has.

Again, I get that details of appearance are less important than an actor’s ability. I doubt anyone would have liked Daniel Radcliffe to have been rejected for the role of Harry Potter because he had blue eyes instead of green.

But what’s bothering me is that John himself, when looking at models for the book cover of Paper Towns when it was first published in 2008, specifically avoided choosing models that were particularly thin to represent Margo.

From a 2008 interview:

A lot of the models that were sent to me looked kind of like clothes hangers, or very thin, sort of disturbingly thin women […] and I was looking for, like, a sixteen year old girl who looked like a sixteen year old girl.

Again, sixteen year old girls also come in all shapes and sizes, and I’m sure there are sixteen year old girls out there who, as John puts it, “look kind of like coat hangers.” There are very thin girls out there. Margo as a character just isn’t one of them.

And my problem here is that after the success of The Fault In Our Stars, John Green likely has a little more influence when it comes to the making of this movie than other authors would for their adaptations. I don’t know this for sure, but considering how involved he was in the making of TFiOS, and the fact that he says in this post that he was there to watch auditions, I have to suspect that there is a chance he could have said, “I wrote this character as a curvy/fat/not thin young woman, and I would prefer to stay true to that.” Of course, he could have said that and was overruled, but what I’m getting at here is that this could have been a phenomenal chance to see some real representation of a non-stereotypically Hollywood skinny heroine. Paper Towns is likely to be a successful movie after the amazing success of TFiOS, and countless sixteen year old girls who do look like Margo, who have a “big ass,” who don’t see girls who look like them on the big screen, they could have been able to go see a Fox 2000 film in theaters starring a girl who looks like them.

Instead, they’ve cast an actress who, as far as I can ascertain from information online, is 5’10” and about 112 lbs, with a BMI of about 16. (BMI is flawed in many ways, but I’m using it to illustrate my point: Cara Delevingne is solidly in the “underweight” category, a far cry from the character who John Green himself did not want to be represented by an underweight fashion model.)

Of course, I was not in the room for her audition. I’m sure she’s a wonderful actress, and if John says she understands Margo, I believe him. I’m just disappointed that this gleaming golden opportunity to have a fat leading actress wasn’t taken advantage of.

cosmo tip #600

expertcosmotips:

if he thinks rape jokes are funny go on a romantic boat ride with him and leave him in the middle of the fucking ocean to die

(via herecomesthundercunt)

zonation:

hola

zonation:

hola

(Source: lucent-kids, via magicbuffet)